Why should I put garlic on my food?

Question by Brenda: Why should I put garlic on my food?
What are the benefits of eating garlic?

Best answer:

Answer by nudangler
Plenty of nice taste and its very good for the blood and heart

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

7 COMMENTS

  1. Health Benefits and Uses
    Garlic’s health benefits and medicinal properties have long been known (1). Garlic has long been considered a herbal “wonder drug”, with a reputation in folklore for preventing everything from the common cold and flu to the Plague! It has been used extensively in herbal medicine (phytotherapy, sometimes spelt phitotherapy). Raw garlic is used by some to treat the symptoms of acne and there is some evidence that it can assist in managing high cholesterol levels. It can even be effective as a natural mosquito repellent.
    In general, a stronger tasting clove of garlic has more sulphur content and hence more medicinal value it’s likely to have. Some people have suggested that organically grown garlic tends towards a higher sulphur level and hence greater benefit to health. In my experience it certainly tastes better so I buy organic whenever possible whether or not it’s best for my health.

    Some people prefer to take garlic supplements. These pills and capsules have the advantage of avoiding garlic breath.

    Modern science has shown that garlic is a powerful natural antibiotic, albeit broad-spectrum rather than targeted. The body does not appear to build up resistance to the garlic, so its positive health benefits continue over time.

    Healthy Antioxidant
    Studies (2) have shown that garlic – especially aged garlic – can have a powerful antioxidant effect. Antioxidants can help to protect the body against damaging “free radicals”.

    Side-Effects
    Raw garlic is very strong, so eating too much could produce problems, for example irritation of or even damage to the digestive tract.
    There are a few people who are allergic to garlic. Symptoms of garlic allergy include skin rash, temperature and headaches. Also, garlic could potentially disrupt anti-coagulants, so it’s best avoided before surgery. As with any medicine, always check with your doctor first and tell your doctor if you are using it.

    Important: Research published in 2001 concluded that garlic supplements “can cause a potentially harmful side effect when combined with a type of medication used to treat HIV/AIDS”. More details are available on the NIAID website.

    See also the warnings page on this site.

    https://www.garlic-central.com/garlic-health.html