Why does acupuncture work?

Question by I love you too!: Why does acupuncture work?
Can you explain a bit. Thank you.

Best answer:

Answer by Danika G
pressure points effect different parts of the brain

What do you think? Answer below!

2 COMMENTS

  1. Acupuncture is a method of inserting fine needles into specific points of the body with the purpose of relieving pain for therapeutic aims. Here are extracts from Wikipedia on acupuncture:

    “Acupuncture (from Lat. acus, “needle”, and pungere, “to prick”) or in Standard Mandarin, 針砭 (zhēn biān) (a related word, 針灸 (zhēn jiǔ), refers to acupuncture together with moxibustion) is a technique of inserting and manipulating fine filiform needles into specific points on the body with the aim of relieving pain and for therapeutic purposes. According to traditional Chinese acupuncture theory, these acupuncture points lie along meridians along which qi, the vital energy, flows. There is no physically verifiable anatomical or histological basis for the existence of acupuncture points or meridians.Modern acupuncturists tend to view them in functional rather than structural terms, (viz. as a useful metaphor in guiding evaluation and care of patients). Acupuncture originated in China and is most commonly associated with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Different types of acupuncture (Classical Chinese, Japanese, Tibetan, Vietnamese and Korean acupuncture) are practiced and taught throughout the world.

    While acupuncture has been a subject of active scientific research since the late 20th century, its effects are not well-understood, and it remains controversial among researchers and clinicians. The body of evidence remains inconclusive but is active and growing, and a 2007 review by Edzard Ernst and colleagues finds that the ’emerging clinical evidence seems to imply that acupuncture is effective for some but not all conditions.’

    The WHO, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the American Medical Association (AMA) and various government reports have all studied and commented on the efficacy (or lack thereof) of acupuncture. There is general agreement that acupuncture is safe when administered by well-trained practitioners using sterile needles, and that further research is appropriate.”

    Traditional diagnosis

    “The acupuncturist decides which points to treat by observing and questioning the patient in order to make a diagnosis according to the tradition which he or she utilizes. In TCM, there are four diagnostic methods: inspection, auscultation and olfaction, inquiring, and palpation).

    Inspection focuses on the face and particularly on the tongue, including analysis of the tongue size, shape, tension, color and coating, and the absence or presence of teeth marks around the edge.
    Auscultation and olfaction refer, respectively, to listening for particular sounds (such as wheezing) and attending to body odor.
    Inquiring focuses on the “seven inquiries”, which are: chills and fever; perspiration; appetite, thirst and taste; defecation and urination; pain; sleep; and menses and leukorrhea.
    Palpation includes feeling the body for tender ‘ashi’ points, and palpation of the left and right radial pulses at two levels of pressure (superficial and deep) and three positions Cun, Guan, Chi(immediately proximal to the wrist crease, and one and two fingers’ breadth proximally, usually palpated with the index, middle and ring fingers).
    Other forms of acupuncture employ additional diagnosic techniques. In many forms of classical Chinese acupuncture, as well as Japanese acupuncture, palpation of the muscles and the hara (abdomen) are central to diagnosis.

    TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine) perspective on treatment of disease

    “Although TCM is based on the treatment of ‘patterns of disharmony’ rather than biomedical diagnoses, practitioners familiar with both systems have commented on relationships between the two. A given TCM pattern of disharmony may be reflected in a certain range of biomedical diagnoses: thus, the pattern called Deficiency of Spleen Qi could manifest as chronic fatigue, diarrhea or uterine prolapse. Likewise, a population of patients with a given biomedical diagnosis may have varying TCM patterns. These observations are encapsulated in the TCM aphorism ‘One disease, many patterns; one pattern, many diseases’. (Kaptchuk, 1982)

    Classically, in clinical practice, acupuncture treatment is typically highly individualized and based on philosophical constructs as well as subjective and intuitive impressions, and not on controlled scientific research.”

    I hope this suffices. Good luck to you.