What is it about the anti-Olympics?

Question by U-Dub/BYU fan♂: What is it about the anti-Olympics?
Why would some people protest against the Games?

Like something and the First Nations at the 2010 Winter Olympic Games at Vancouver, Canada and the Tibetans at the 2008 Summer Olympic Games at Beijing, China.

Best answer:

Answer by tuna.talkalot
These protesters are professionals. They’ll go anywhere. Pathetic way to make a living.

What do you think? Answer below!

7 COMMENTS

  1. Yeah, I saw that, when Gretzky was bringing the flame to the giant torch, there were protesters right outside the stadium.

    I don’t really know why they were protesting, but you know, there will always be someone with a different opinion about something. I guess that was them.

  2. There are large groups of people that travel the world to protest whatever is going on at the time.
    They show up at major events and political meetings, they recruit locals who like to be a part of something, even if they don’t necessarily agree with the causes.
    I imagine these people will move on to the next major event that will give them a chance to be on the news, and forget their reason for being in Vancouver.

  3. A lot of people are homeless and poor on the east of of the city
    too many billions of dollars go to surveillance than into health care or other things like to support the needs of the homeless
    Now they try to get 15 minutes of spotlight IN the media iin front of the world so everyone can see them
    NO ONE IS PROTESTING AGAINST
    they use it to voice out their issue with the game and their government

  4. The Olympics are a taxpayers nightmare. There’s the case with the homeless people also.

    I’m 15, and once I get a job and start paying taxes, I’ll be paying for the Olympics. The government made false promises, which they definitely shouldn’t have done. Now, the common public will be suffering and we’ll most likely end up in debt.

  5. Protesters are not “against sports”. Probably most would be cheering for the Olympics, if the Olympics were what they are supposed to be. Anyhow, different games raise different issues. About this particular games…

    80 of the 203 First Nation bands even refused to take VANOCs money (well, BC’s money passing through VANOCs hands) to participate in the charade of “Canada is a friend of the natives” because of the horrible crimes perpetrated against them by Canada’s colonialism, both historically and recently. Check out the boarding school system if you want just an example. “The attempt to force assimilation involved punishing children for speaking their own languages or practicing their own faiths, leading to allegations in the 20th century of cultural genocide and ethnocide. There was an elevated rate of physical and sexual abuse. Overcrowding, poor sanitation, and a lack of medical care led to high rates of tuberculosis, and death rates of up to 69 percent.”
    Many people stand in solidarity with them. I mean, who wouldn’t.

    Some ecologists protest the approx 100.000 trees that were clearcut for the “greenest games”, other ecologists protest the seal hunt.

    Some people are deeply troubled with the fact that homelessness has doubled in Vancouver since the bid, instead of disappearing as they promised in order to get people to vote for the games.

    Others are mad about the price tag, which is about 6 times higher than the original budget (again, the budget that people voted for).

    Others are worried about the criminalization and harassing of the poor, including that bylaw that allowed “reasonable force” to take unwilling homeless people to shelters.

    Others dislike their loss of civil rights. The bylaw that allowed the police to enter your house and take a critical sign from your window, or charge you $ 10.000 for distributing critical texts. Or the journalists that came to cover the protests and were interrogated, humilliated and turned around at the frontier.

    That from the top of my head, but there were more… :-D

    In two words, people protest lies and oppression.