What can I grow on my window sill that is small and requires little daily sunlight?

Question by piper32_95037: What can I grow on my window sill that is small and requires little daily sunlight?
I am looking for easy to grow, small, plants, herb, or flowers on a window sill. I live in Northern California with great weather and the window sill is west facing with about 5 to 7 hours of direct sunlight tops(depending on season). The window sill is only 4 inches wide so a big plant is unrealistic. Something in very small containers (like the ones that most seedlings come from the nursery) is what I am looking for. Any suggestions?

Best answer:

Answer by Reina021
Marijuana

What do you think? Answer below!

3 COMMENTS

  1. You could try African Violets.The do require quit a bit of light This site says:
    Insufficient light is one of the major reasons Violets do not bloom well. Violets must have 10 to 14 (16 is max) hours of bright light per day (no direct sun)

    https://www.african-violets.com/tips.htm

    Do a search on”growing african violets” will give you more information. See what you think.

  2. Richters suggests chives, dill, mint, basil, oregano, thyme, coriander, rosemary, sage, and savory as good candidates to grow indoors. The article also discusses light requirements. “Herbs don’t tolerate north-facing windows, or any window that gets less than four hours of direct sunshine a day.”

    Think about how you could adjust the growing conditions at your west facing window. What if you add a fluorescent light to extend the hours of good light? What if you add a shelf extension to your window sill to increase the area to hold the plants?

    Liv Green Magazine discusses the need for humidity. They say, “Place the plants inside a larger, ideally decorative, waterproof container which has a layer of small stones on the bottom. Add water to the container, but not enough to reach the base of the plant pots. As this water evaporates it will humidify the plants.”

    You don’t mention what is in front of the window. Is it possible for you to add a narrow table or bookcase that comes just up to the sill. Sometimes a small bureau works well. These are just some ideas to get you thinking.

    Healthy plants grow—taller and wider. If you are successful with your indoor garden, your plant will outgrow its pot and you will need to repot in a larger one. Space will be an issue.

    Is it possible to hang a pot in front of the window? Visit your local greenhouse or plant nursery and look at the low light tropical plants they have. Many of them have trailing growth tendencies and look great in front of windows.

    The Council on the Environment of New York City has a nice article on very-low-light plants and emphasizes the idea that a window doesn’t equate to good light if there are buildings, trees, or curtains that block the light. They have a list of indoor plants that grow well indoors in very-low light. Heart-leaf philodendron, Swedish ivy, kangaroo vine, and some of the ferns grow well in hanging pots.

    Good luck.

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