How did alexander the great affect the hellenistic empire and vice versa?

Question by melissa: How did alexander the great affect the hellenistic empire and vice versa?
what did alexander the great do in this age? what did he change? what problem did he fix/what did he improve?
links to good websites that i can use as a source would be nice. thanks. =]

Best answer:

Answer by theoneoflight68
Dude he freakin went out and conquered so much land for greece i think it was. He was only 20 when he started and he was undefeated! hes soo cool

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1 COMMENT

  1. he spread hellenism to asia and north africa. he left governers in these places whcih after his death started their own dynasties like the ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt.
    much of the cultural legacy of the Greeks continued even after his name was legend and stories of his conquests were forgotten from many of these parts – the name alexander is there in some forms in almost all these regions (shasha in Russia, armenia and other neighboring states; iskander in turkish, sikander in persia and India etc.. buddhist scupture and art in india was highly influenced by the helenic life-like style and greek medicine (called ‘yunani medicine’) also flourished in persia and india.
    how did the hellenistic civilization influence Alexander? well, he was from Macedon; on the outskirts of the hellenistic civilization. they were almost considered part fo the barbarian lands by the likes of athens and thebes. that was a chip ont he shoulder for boht Phillip and his son; to gain acceptance they had to struggle and conquer the other greeks; alexander even created legends about himself and oracle. his father got him a athenian tutor in aristotle whose teachings had a profound influence on Alexander; infact it encouraged him to spread hellenism everywhere in the world. he saw himself as a reincarnation of Achilles nd wanted to recreate the glory of ancient greece. inspired by Herodoctus, Xenophon and other greek historians he took his own historian during his conquests (Clemesthenes) and thats why we know so much about it. the fact is, he still was never accepted totally by the other greeks, but ofcourse they had to pay homage and call them great.
    This ofcourse is a very complex question and the space constraints has made this answer simplistic…