Cudweed

Gnaphalium_uliginosum,cudweed
By Jerzy Opioła (Own work) [GFDL (https://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC-BY-SA-2.5-2.0-1.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Gnaphalium uliginosum-Cudweed

Family: Asteraceae or Compositae

Other names: Filaginella uliginosa, Marsh Cudweed, Cotton Weed, March Everlasting

Habitat: Most of Europe, including Britain, to W. Asia. Damp places in sandy fields, heaths, waysides etc, on acid soils.

Cudweed is little used as a medicinal herb today, though it is occasionally taken for its astringent, antiseptic and anti-catarrhal properties. The whole plant is anti-inflammatory, astringent, diaphoretic and diuretic. It may also have aphrodisiac and anti-depressant effects. It is used both internally and externally in the treatment of laryngitis, upper respiratory catarrh and tonsillitis, whilst in Russia it is used in the treatment of high blood pressure.

Gnaphalium_uliginosum,cudweed
By Bernd Haynold (selbst fotografiert – own picture) [GFDL (https://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC-BY-2.5 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

Description of Cudweed:

Gnaphalium uliginosum; Cudweed is a ANNUAL growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in) by 0.2 m (0ft 8in). It is in flower from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very acid soils.
It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation of Cudweed:

Prefers a position in full sun or partial shade in a moist to wet light acid soil.

Propagation of Cudweed:

Seed – sow late spring in situ and only just cover the seed.

Collection of Cudweed:

The plant is harvested when it is in flower and is dried for later use.

Culinary uses of Cudweed:

None known

Gnaphalium_Uliginosum_botanical,cudweed_botanicalMedicinal uses of Cudweed:
Anti-inflammatory,  Aphrodisiac, Astringent,  Diaphoretic,  Diuretic.

Part used: Whole herb

Cudweed is little used in modern herbalism, though it is occasionally taken for its astringent, antiseptic and anti-catarrhal properties. The whole plant is anti-inflammatory, astringent, diaphoretic and diuretic. It may also have aphrodisiac and anti-depressant effects. It is used both internally and externally in the treatment of laryngitis, upper respiratory catarrh and tonsillitis, whilst in Russia it is used in the treatment of high blood pressure.

Other uses of Cudweed:

Dye.

Yellow and green dyes are obtained from the whole plant.

Esoteric uses of Cudweed:
The Chemistry:

Seven flavonoid glucosides and three phenylpropanoids. Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

For security, use of Google's reCAPTCHA service is required which is subject to the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

If you agree to these terms, please click here.