Burr Marigold

Biden_Tripartita,Burr_marigold

Bidens tripartita-Burr Marigold

Family: Asteraceae or Compositae

Other names: Water Agrimony, Biden’s Herb, Bastard agrimony , bastard hemp ,hairy beggar-ticks , 3 lobe beggar ticks , lumb , needle grass , Spanish needles , sticktights , Water Hemp

Habitat: Most of Europe, including Britain, north to 63°, east to W. Asia. Ditches, pond and lake margins, sides of streams etc.

Burr marigold is little used as a medicinal herb nowadays, but it was once esteemed for its styptic properties being used to quickly staunch blood flow – it was often used to treat uterine haemorrhage and conditions producing blood in the urine. The whole plant is antiseptic, aperient, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, narcotic, sedative, styptic and sudorific. It is an excellent remedy for ruptured blood vessels and bleeding of any kind, and is of benefit to people with consumption. It is used internally to treat bladder and kidney problems, blood in the urine, uterine bleeding, ulcerative colitis and peptic ulcers. Externally, it is used in the treatment of alopecia. It is usually combined with a carminative herb such as ginger when used to treat digestive tract ailments.

Bidens_tripartita,Burr marigold
By H. Zell (Own work) [GFDL (https://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Description of Burr Marigold:

Biden’s Tripartita; Burr-Marigold is a ANNUAL growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in).
It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, hover-flies.

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. Needs full sun. It prefers moist or wet soil.

Cultivation of Burr Marigold:

Succeeds in any moderately fertile damp to wet soil in full sun. The flowering heads smell like rosin or cedar when they are burnt. The seed coats have reflexed prickles which allow them to adhere to clothing, animal fur etc. When growing on the edge a pond, these seeds have been known to kill goldfish by adhering to their gills.

Propagation of Burr Marigold:

Seed – sow in situ during early spring and only just cover the seed. So long as the soil does not dry out, the seed usually germinates in 2 – 3 weeks at 15°c.

Collection of Burr Marigold:

The plant is harvested as it comes into flower and is dried for later use.

Culinary uses of Burr Marigold:

Edible Parts: Leaves.
Edible Uses:

Young leaves – cooked

Bidens_Tripartita,Burr_MarigoldMedicinal uses of Burr-Marigold:

Part used: Whole plant.

Antiseptic, Aperient,  Astringent,  Diuretic,  Emmenagogue,  Febrifuge;, Narcotic,  Sedative, Styptic.

Burr marigold is little used as a medicine nowadays, but it was once esteemed for its styptic properties being used to quickly staunch blood flow – it was often used to treat uterine haemorrhage and conditions producing blood in the urine. The whole plant is antiseptic, aperient, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, febrifuge, narcotic, sedative, styptic and sudorific. It is an excellent remedy for ruptured blood vessels and bleeding of any kind, and is of benefit to people with consumption. It is used internally to treat bladder and kidney problems, blood in the urine, uterine bleeding, ulcerative colitis and peptic ulcers. Externally, it is used in the treatment of alopecia. It is usually combined with a carminative herb such as ginger when used to treat digestive tract ailments. The plant is harvested as it comes into flower and is dried for later use.

Culpepper tells us that it was called Hepatorium ‘because it strengthens the liver’:’it healeth and drieth, cutteth and cleanseth thick and tough humours of the breast and for this I hold it inferior to few herbs that grow . . . it helpeth the dropsy and yellow jaundice; it opens the obstruction of the liver, mollifies the hardness of the spleen, being applied outwardly. . . it is an excellent remedy for the third day ague; . . . it kills worms and cleanseth the body of sharp humours which are the cause of itch and scab; the herb being burnt, the smoke thereof drives away flies, wasps, etc. It strengthens the lungs exceedingly. Country people give it to their cattle when they are troubled with cough or are broken-winded.’

Other uses of Burr Marigold:

Dye, Repellent.

Yields a black dye. The part of the plant that is used is not specified. The burning herb repels insects and flies. The flowers yield a yellow dye of indifferent quality when alum is used as a mordant.

Esoteric uses of Burr Marigold:

None known but if you use this herb for nay purpose please let us know!

The Chemistry:

Evaluation of the chemical composition of Bidens species has revealed the presence of flavonoids, xanthophylls, volatile oil, acetylenes and polyacetalenes, sterols, aurones, chalcones, caffeine and caffeoyl derivatives, and tannins. 3 , 4 , 5 , 8 , 9 Antimicrobial activity is believed to be associated with phenylheptatriyne, linolic acid, and linolenic acid. 10 Friedelin, friedelan-3-beta-ol, and flavonoids, such as quercetin, are associated with anti-inflammatory activity. 10Antioxidant action has been attributed to glucopyranosides found in B. pilosa , 9 while polyacetylenic glucosides may act on T-helper cells.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

3. Li S , Kuang HX , Okada Y , Okuyama T . New acetylenic glucosides from Bidens bipinnata L . Chem Pharm Bull . 2004;52:439-440.
4. Kumar JK , Sinha AK . A new disubstituted acetylacetone from the leaves of Bidens pilosa Linn . Nat Prod Res . 2003;17:71-74.
5. Sarker SD , Bartholomew B , Nash RJ , Robinson N . 5- O -methylhoslundin: An unusual flavonoid from Bidens pilosa (Asteraceae) . Biochem Syst Ecol . 2000;28:591-593.

8. Li S , Kuang HX , Okada Y , Okuyama T . New flavanone and chalcone glucosides from Bidens bipinnata Linn . J Asian Nat Prod Res . 2005;7:67-70.
9. Chiang YM , Chuang DY , Wang SY , Kuo YH , Tsai PW , Shyur LF . Metabolite profiling and chemopreventive bioactivity of plant extracts from Bidens pilosa . J Ethnopharmacol . 2004;95:409-419.
10. Geissberger P , Sequin URS . Constituents of Bidens pilosa L.: do the components found so far explain the use of this plant in traditional medicine? Acta Trop . 1991;48:251-261.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here